Editorial Policies

Section Policies

FRONT MATTER

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

CONTENTS

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EDITORIAL

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ARTICLES

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PRAXIS

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BOOK REVIEWS

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Unchecked Peer Reviewed
 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 

Editorial Team

Editor: Prof Sarojini Nadar, University of the Western Cape

Co-editor: Dr Fatima Seedat, University of Cape Town

Editor Emeritus: Prof Isabel Apawo Phiri, World Council of Churches

Managing editor: Dr Lee-Shae Salma Scharnick-Udemans, University of the Western Cape

Associate editor: Dr Megan Robertson

Journal assistant: Ms Ashleigh Petersen

Journal Administrator: Ms Ferial Marlie

 

 

Editorial Board

Editor: Prof Sarojini Nadar, University of the Western Cape

Co-editor: Dr Fatima Seedat, University of Cape Town

Editor Emeritus: Prof Isabel Apawo Phiri, World Council of Churches

Managing editor: Dr Lee-Shae Salma Scharnick-Udemans, University of the Western Cape

Associate editor: Dr Megan Robertson

Dr Adriaan van Klinken (University of Leeds)

Prof Asonzeh Ukah (University of Cape Town)

Prof Aysha Hidayatullah (University of San Francisco)

Dr Damaris Parsitau (Egerton University)

Dr Farah Zeb (Independent Scholar)

Dr Johnathan Jodamus (University of the Western Cape)

Prof Lindsay Clowes (University of the Western Cape)

Prof Narnia Bohler-Muller (Human Sciences Research Council)

Prof Nina Hoel (University of Oslo)

Dr Nontando Hadebe (St Augustine College)

Prof Rosalind I. J. Hackett (University of Tennessee)

Dr Sophia Chirongoma (Midlands State University)

Dr Susannah Cornwall (University of Exeter)

Rev Dr Vicentia Kgabe (College of Transfiguration)

Prof Zintombizethu Matebeni (University of the Western Cape)

 

In-house Standard Requirements before Peer Review

In-house Standard Requirements before Peer Review

Length
Submissions should be between 5000 and 8000 words (including the abstract, footnotes and bibliography).


Abstract
Submissions should include an abstract of between 100 and 200 words.


Key words
A list of 2 to 6 key words should be included.


Author details
Please include a short description including the author’s name, academic position and research interests.


Style
The AJGR follows the Chicago Manual Style of referencing with minor specifications as outlined in the AJGR Style Sheet. We require all citations to be in the form of numbered footnotes (not end notes or in-text referencing). Please refer to the attached AJGR Style Sheet for more details.

 

Focus and Scope

The African Journal for Gender and Religion (AJGR) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal and publishes original interdisciplinary research on Gender and Religion. AJGR moved in 2017 from the Gender and Religion programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (or the Centre for Deconstructive Theology) to the Desmond Tutu Centre for Spirituality and Society at the University of the Western Cape. The AJGR publishes semi-annually and is an accredited publication of the South African Department of Higher Education and Training. Since 2004 this journal has published inter-disciplinary articles which explore phenomena and trends emerging from the intersections of religion, gender and sexuality. We are an African journal and seek to encourage authors to reflect on Africa as context, concept and theory. However, we are equally welcoming of international contributions engaging with a variety of social and geographic contexts.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts that fall within the focus of the journal. The content of the article can be situated within a range of academic disciplines such as biblical studies, philosophy, theology, anthropology, cultural, and religious studies. However, all articles should be well structured and framed by a gender perspective both methodologically and theoretically.
It is expected that submissions will contribute new and original knowledge to the subject/theme that is being addressed. Hence:
(A) In addition to the abstract provided, please ensure that in the introduction your present your argument in such a way that the unique contribution you seek to make to the debate in that particular field of scholarship is made clear.
(B) It is essential to foreground both a central question and a theoretical/conceptual approach and methodology for approaching that question.
It is only then that the Editors will consider your article for the process of double blind peer review. As a journal accredited with the South African Department of Higher Education and Training, AJGR will only accept and publish articles, which have gone through a rigorous review process. The peer readers will then advise the editorial panel on the suitability of particular articles for AJGR publication.


Information for Book Reviewers:
The AJGR invites its reviews of recently published books related to gender and religion. If there is a book you would like to review please contact the editorial team. Publishers may send review copies however, we don’t guarantee that unsolicited copies will be reviewed.


Information for Praxis Articles:
The AJGR encourages articles to be submitted under a section of the journal called “praxis”. Praxis articles must show evidence of how sound theoretical reflections are brought to bear on practical action. Within this section on “praxis” we will publish essays that are not considered “mainstream academic” but nonetheless point to theories of gender justice in action. Submissions are evaluated through an editorial committee screening process. The editorial team reserves the right to obtain reviews from two or more competent scholars.


African Journal of Gender and Religion
EDITORIAL TEAM

 

AJGR Style Sheet

TO PROSPECTIVE CONTRIBUTORS
Written submissions to the African Journal of Gender and Religion (AJGR) may take the form of researched scholarly articles or essays. Book reviews, brief responses to articles, conference reports and summaries of research projects are also welcome. Submissions are evaluated through an editorial committee screening process. Further, the articles are also sent to a maximum of two competent scholars working in a similar field of interest for peer-review. Prospective contributors of scholarly articles should email a copy of their manuscript to the editors, typed single-spaced, in British English, using an A4 page format with 2.5cm margins on all sides, and in 10pt Arial font; include full documentation in the form of footnotes and bibliography, along with an abstract and a brief autobiographical statement. The Editorial Committee reserves the right to bring contributions into line with the AJGR and make other editorial changes as required.


Contributors are responsible for language editing. If the Referees and/or Editorial Committee recommend additional editing the contribution will be referred back to the author.

STYLE

Article Title
The article title is typed in a 12 point bold font with all words being capitalized except articles, conjunctions and prepositions.


Author’s name1
Author affiliation, contact email, and short biography are included as a footnote.
Author’s name is typed in 10 point bold font.


Subheading
All subheadings are typed in 12 point bold font using upper and lower case.


Main Text:
Manuscripts are to be typed single-spaced in a 12pt font, margins should be set at 2.5cm on all sides. In order to put emphasis, italics should be employed rather than underlining.
Short quotes should be enclosed in quotation marks (“ ” ); full stops and commas are to be placed inside quotations marks whereas question marks or exclamation points should be placed outside quotations, unless they form the part of the quotation itself. Very brief quotations should generally not be set off as block quotations, except for emphasis. Quotations longer than four or five lines should be set off from the text, indented 0.5cm either side of the page margins as a block quotation. Only a single space is required at the end of a sentence after the punctuation. Please do not double space between sentences.

 

English:
Authors can follow either British or American spelling conventions, but should do so consistently throughout the paper.
Use the adverbs “first” and “second” to introduce a series, not “firstly,” “secondly,” etc.
The names of centuries should be spelled out: e.g., the nineteenth century, not the 19th century.


CITATIONS
In general, we follow the Chicago Manual of Style following the “Notes and Bibliography” system with some minor specifications. All citations are to be in the form of numbered footnotes (not endnotes, not in-text references), with the full bibliographic reference in the first citation, followed by shortened citations for any further citation of the same source (not ibid. or op. cit.).This is not a comprehensive style guide; for that we refer authors to reference works on the Chicago Manual of Style. See: www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.


All footnote numbers appear in the text after punctuation. The first citation of a work should give complete information for the work, including the author’s first name or initial. Complete publication information should also be given. For books this includes the place of publication, name of publisher, and year of publication; for journal articles the volume number should be included as well as the date. Subsequent references to the work should give the author’s last name, a short version of the title, and the page number(s). Please do not use idem, ibid. or op. cit.


Book:
Footnotes
1.Rosemary Radford Ruether, Sexism and God-Talk: Toward a Feminist Theology (Boston: Beacon Press, 1993), 94-110.
2.Rebecca Chopp, Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education.(Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 1995).


Shortened Footnotes
1.Radford Ruether, Sexism and God-Talk, 99.
2.Chopp, Saving Work, 15.
Bibliography Entry (in alphabetical order)
1.Radford Ruether, Rosemary. Sexism and God-Talk: Toward a Feminist Theology.Boston: Beacon Press, 1993.
2.Chopp, Rebecca. Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education.Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 1995.